Friday, March 20, 2009

Inspiration & Palette

This week has been a visually stimulating week. A record was made, I painted four days in a row. I am feeling happy and exhausted now that it is Friday evening. The painting I worked on yesterday and most of today still needs a few more finishing touches so I will post it early next week when it is complete. In place of a painting photo, here is one of my paint palette.
The palette a piece of masonite that has been spray painted a medium gray to provide a uniform neutral background to mix paint. I typically paint with a straight pigment and white for most colors, mixing some on the palette but majority of time I mix on the painting itself. The colors are (clockwise from the lower left hand corner): Cobalt Violet, Raw Umber, Dio. Purple, French Ultra Marine, Cobalt Blue, Cerulean Blue, Cobalt Turquoise, Cobalt Green, Windsor Green, Viridian, Cad. Green Lt., Cad. Lemon, Cad. Yellow Lt., Cad Yellow, Naples Yellow, Old Holland Brilliant Yellow Lt., Indian Yellow, Jaune Brilliant, Cad. Scarlet, Cad. Red, Cad. Red Deep, Perylene Red, Quinaqridone Red, Permanent Rose, Permanent Alizarin Crimson, Brilliant Yellow-Reddish, Cremnitz White, Tit. White, Zinc Buff, and Ivory Black.

During the week I follow several blogs, they are my way of connecting with fascinationg pop culture. Here are a few posts that captured my thoughts this week:

~ Artslice’s post on Natelie Goldberg ~ I have added these books to my ever growing reading list.
~ Bliss’s polaroids
~ An Aesthete’s Lament ~ “Well said Phillip Borsinney” and “Well Written John Galsworth” ~ I read the Forsythe Sage this January, it was an interesting survey of Victorian England.
~ Interesting Quote

7 comments:

A said...

I hope it's not too forward of me to make a suggestion, but I can't help myself. Now that you're doing this full time, I'd love to see you set up a storefront at the handmade website, www.etsy.com. Your work is far more skilled and professional than a lot of artists that are getting much higher prices for their work than you're getting on Ebay. Etsy has lower fees, a very simple interface, and a huge marketplace, which means a lot of exposure for artists, and you set your price. I sell prints of my artwork and the occasional original there and have had a great experience. I do no marketing except occasional relisting and am doing a good business. If it's not for you, I totally understand, but I wanted you to know it was out there!

E. Floyd said...

Thanks for your suggestion "A". I have been toying with the idea of setting up an Etsy store. It just is that I also enjoy the auction aspect of eBay as well. In the next six months I am going to investigate this more and see what will work best.

I appreciate the compliment and like receiving feedback. Thanks and have a nice weekend. Liz

Paula Villanova said...

Isn't it amazing how tired you can get from a full day of painting? People often think I'm kidding but I believe that the tension that comes with the on-going decision making can be very stressful, albeit good stress...I feel wiped out sometimes..and that's not even the plein air days! There's nothing like it though...

E. Floyd said...

Paula, I have to agree painting all day involves a lot of thought work and physical stamina. As of Sunday morning I am still wiped out. Making is a great day to rest and read.

theresamillerwatercolors said...

Wow, congratulations on the transition to being a fulltime artist!!! Will be watching your journey. I love your daffodils and mangoes, below...... Happy painting!

theresamillerwatercolors said...

I was just wondering how long you worked as an architect. Being an architect was a dream for me, except that I never had a chance to pursue it - there were so many other things to study, so many interests, so little time...

E. Floyd said...

Thanks Theresa for visiting and commenting. I am excited about this new direction my career is taking.

I practiced architecture for almost 9 years, and dedicated almost 13 years total including education. It has been an interesting career and I still love looking and investigating the art of architecture. I just became burned out by the profession which in my experience is 5% creative work and 95% paper pushing and dull work. This was my experience, others may find more enjoyment out of producing construction documents. Working to produce the construction documents just became a grind to me.